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Postnatal contraception discontinuation: different methods, same problem
  1. Mandisa Singata-Madliki1,
  2. Nolusindiso Dekile-Yonto1,
  3. G J Hofmeyr1,
  4. Theresa A Lawrie1,2
  1. 1 Effective Care Research Unit (ECRU), Eastern Cape Department of Health, East London Hospital Complex, University of Fort Hare, East London, Eastern Cape, South Africa
  2. 2 Cochrane Office, Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK
  1. Correspondence to Mandisa Singata-Madliki, Effective Care Research Unit (ECRU), Eastern Cape Department of Health, East London Hospital Complex, University of Fort Hare, East London, Eastern Cape 5247, South Africa; mandisa.singata{at}gmail.com

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Following publication of our trial on the effects of postnatal depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) compared with the copper intrauterine device (IUD) on postnatal depression in this journal in July 2016,1 we have sought to evaluate contraceptive discontinuation in our study sample. Postnatal contraception is promoted as part of the WHO strategy to reduce the unmet need for family planning in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and to reduce preventable maternal and child mortality.2 However, little is known about discontinuation rates associated with postnatal contraception use in these settings.

From the trial, 75 of 242 participants were contactable two or more years after randomisation and 54 consented to a follow-up interview, which was conducted by a Masters student from the University of Fort Hare (NDY). Twenty-three women had received DMPA and 31 women an IUD. In the DMPA and IUD arms, respectively, 48% (11/23) and 42% …

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