Article Text

Download PDFPDF

Questions about intimate partner violence should be part of contraceptive counselling: findings from a community-based longitudinal study in Nicaragua
  1. Mariano Salazar1,
  2. Eliette Valladares2,
  3. Ulf Högberg3
  1. 1Researcher, Center for Demography and Health Research, Nicaraguan National Autonomous University, León, Nicaragua and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
  2. 2Researcher, Center for Demography and Health Research and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nicaraguan National Autonomous University, León, Nicaragua
  3. 3Professor, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden and Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mariano Salazar, c/o Ulf Högberg, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, SE 901 85 Umeå, Sweden; mariano.salazar{at}epiph.umu.se

Abstract

Background and methodology The study aim was to examine whether exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with reversible contraceptive use in ever-pregnant partnered women. The authors conducted a longitudinal panel study in León municipality, Nicaragua. At baseline (2002–2003), 478 pregnant women were interviewed and 398 were available for questioning about contraceptive use 40–47 months after childbirth. IPV was assessed at baseline and follow-up, with women classified as never abused, ending abuse, continued abuse or new abuse. Reversible contraceptive use was defined as women using any form of contraception apart from sterilisation. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were used to assess the association between reversible contraceptive use, IPV patterns and IPV exposures at follow-up.

Results Eighty percent of the women were not pregnant and with a partner at follow-up. Half were using reversible contraceptives and 28% were sterilised. Women exposed to a continued abuse pattern (AOR 2.50, 95% CI 11.04–5.99), and those exposed to emotional (AOR 2.80, 95% CI 1.32–5.95), physical (AOR 3.60, 95% CI 1.15–11.10) or any IPV at follow-up (AOR 2.59, 95% CI 1.24–5.40) had higher odds of reversible contraceptive use than those not exposed, even after adjusting for demographic factors. No significant differences in the type of reversible contraceptive used were found between women exposed or not to IPV.

Discussion and conclusions IPV exposure was associated with more reversible contraceptive use. Abuse inquiring at health facilities providing contraceptives should be implemented to identify women exposed to IPV and provide adequate support.

View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Funding Funding for this project was provided by Swedish-Nicaragua research collaboration supported by Sida International Development Cooperation Agency/Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation and from Umeå Centre for Global Health Research with support from the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Grant No. 2006-1512). The sponsors of this study had no role in the study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, writing of the report or the decision to submit for publication.

  • Competing interests None.

  • Ethical approval The study was approved by the Ethics Research Committee at the Nicaraguan National Autonomous University, León, Nicaragua.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Highlights from this issue
    British Medical Journal Publishing Group