Article Text

Download PDFPDF

A service-based approach to nurse training in sexual and reproductive health care
Free
  1. Jill Shawe1,
  2. Sarah Cox2,
  3. Nikki Penny3,
  4. Alison White4,
  5. Christopher Wilkinson5
  1. 1Senior Research Associate/Specialist Nurse, Department of Sexual & Reproductive Health, University College London, Institute for Women's Health, London, UK
  2. 2Specialist Nurse, Department of Sexual & Reproductive Health, Central and North West London (CNWL) NHS Foundation Trust, Margaret Pyke Centre, London, UK
  3. 3Head of Nursing, CNWL NHS Foundation Trust, Margaret Pyke Centre, London, UK
  4. 4Clinical Services Manager CNWL NHS Foundation Trust, Margaret Pyke Centre, London, UK
  5. 5Lead Consultant CNWL NHS Foundation Trust, Margaret Pyke Centre, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Jill Shawe, Department of Sexual & Reproductive Health, University College London, Institute for Women's Health, London, UK; j.shawe{at}ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Aims To develop and pilot a reproducible curriculum for nurses with limited or no sexual and reproductive health care (SRH) experience to become competent dual-trained practitioners. The model used supernumerary training posts and clinical training and assessment adapted from that used to train doctors for the Diploma of the Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare in the UK.

Background There is currently no standard SRH nurse training in the UK. Nurses undertake various university-based qualifications supported by clinical sessions, and employers can be reluctant to sponsor these because of the cost and the time required.

Methods Two nurses were employed on a 6-month programme consisting of five parts: (1) the Faculty of Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) e-learning programme, in conjunction with e-Learning for Healthcare; (2) the FSRH ‘Course of 5’; (3) structured clinical training; (4) visits to other relevant services; and (5) clinical supervision and mentoring. Assessment was by a portfolio of evidence; signed competences; reflections from clinical sessions; and outcomes of visits to services. The project was evaluated by means of questionnaires and interviews with trainees and staff.

Conclusions The project demonstrated that by using a model similar to that used for basic SRH medical training it is possible to train nurses in core holistic SRH care within the workplace. Many SRH services are reporting severe difficulties in the recruitment of nurses trained in SRH, and this practice-based training would allow services and providers to invest in training to build up the workforce they require.

  • education and training
  • service delivery
View Full Text

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request Permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.

Linked Articles

  • Highlights from this issue
    British Medical Journal Publishing Group