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Provision of hormonal and long-acting reversible contraceptive services by general practices in Scotland, UK (2004–2009)
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  1. Anusha Reddy1,
  2. Margaret Watson2,
  3. Philip Hannaford3,
  4. Karen Lefevre4,
  5. Dolapo Ayansina5
  1. 1Medical Student, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  2. 2Senior Research Fellow, Centre of Primary Academic Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  3. 3NHS Grampian Professor of Primary Care, Centre of Primary Academic Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  4. 4General Practitioner Principal, Centre of Primary Academic Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  5. 5Research Fellow, Centre of Primary Academic Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
  1. Correspondence to Ms Anusha Reddy, Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK; a.reddy.08{at}aberdeen.ac.uk

Abstract

Background In the UK, a large proportion of contraceptive services are provided from general practice. However, little is known about which contraceptive services are provided and to whom.

Study design Descriptive serial cross-sectional study of women aged 12–55 years, registered with 191 general practices in Scotland, UK between 2004 and 2009.

Results Annual incidence of provision of hormonal and long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) increased from 27.7% in 2004 to 30.1% in 2009. Amongst those women registered with a general practice for the full 5-year period the provision of LARCs increased from 8.8% to 12.5% (p<0.001). For the same group, the provision of emergency hormonal contraception (EHC) decreased from 5.2% to 2.6% (p<0.001).

Conclusions With the exception of EHC, there was an increase over time in the provision of hormonal contraceptives and LARCs from general practices. It is important that a full range of contraceptive options remains easily available to women.

  • family planning service provision
  • hormonal contraception
  • long-acting reversible contraception
  • emergency contraception
  • general practice
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