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Primary care endometrial sampling for abnormal uterine bleeding: a pilot study
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  • Published on:
    Endometrial sampling has been undertaken for many years in some general practices.
    • Clare J Seamark, General Practitioner and FSRH Regional Training Advisor The Honiton Practice
    It was very pleasing to see a paper reporting a pilot study of Primary care endometrial sampling1as this was something I have been involved with over the last 25 years, although I was a little disappointed that there was no reference to some of the previous work on this subject in primary care2. I published two papers on the subject in 1998, The first considered the end of the operation Dilatation and Curettage (D & C) which until the 1990s had been the investigation of choice for abnormal uterine bleeding and the emergence of new techniques such as Pipelle sampling3. The second paper I published was entitled Endometrial sampling in general practice and was a case series of 38 women investigated for unexpected vaginal bleeding4. I had introduced the procedure to the Honiton Practice in 1993; having held the qualification for intrauterine techniques for many years and having acquired further training from the local gynaecology department and taken advice from the relevant defence unions. It was not part of General Medical Services then and under new general practice arrangements it was recognized as ‘provision of secondary care within primary care’ and remunerated. It is also important to realize that the current 2 week wait referral procedure did not exist and sometimes women with abnormal bleeding could w...
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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.